It was an unmistakable condition of his candidacy: no primary.  While Donald Trump’s flirtation with a run for Governor came to an end Friday his call for a united Republican Party did not.

“He wanted the nomination without a primary.  I think many party leaders around the state are in the same boat. They don’t want to see a primary,” said Erie County GOP Chairman Nick Langworthy.

The effort to convince Trump to run for Governor began in Western New York last summer.  Langworthy himself held several meetings with the real estate mogul encouraging him to see the process through all the way to the State Republican Party Convention in May.

“I think he was confusing to some extent the way we nominate in New York for somewhat of a presidential primary system. They’re very, very different. New Yorkhas very arcane ways to nominate our candidates and as he got more educated in that process he gave serious, serious consideration in the last two weeks and going to the convention,” Langworthy said.

When Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino officially entered the race it seemed to have little impact on Trump’s candidacy.  But after Astorino’s week long tour of the state Langworthy believes Trump concluded a “clear path” was impossible.

“I think he came to a realization that this would not be an uncontested nomination fight. He thought a primary was inevitable and right from the beginning he said, ‘I don’t want a primary,” said Langworthy. 

Still some Trump supporters are pointing the finger at State GOP Chairman Ed Cox.  One of the State Assemblyman who helped hatch the “Draft Trump” movement believes his exit makes Cox a marked man.

“It’s disappointing that the Republican Party is so inept in New York State. We will support Rob Astorino. This is Mr. Cox’s play, this is what he wanted, and if Astorino doesn’t win for some reason, Mr. Cox will have to answer to that,” said East Aurora Republican David DiPietro. 

Langworthy admits the initial skepticism from the “senior party leadership” about Trump’s sincerity may have turned the real estate mogul off.  But he believes Cox had come around to the idea of a Trump candidacy and was encouraging him to go to the convention.

“Ultimately the decision was going to lie with Donald Trump whether or not he was going to run for Governor. He’s a super successful businessman, someone that’s achieved a lot of his goals in life. If he wanted to move forward with this, I think we showed him a way where he could’ve achieved it,” Langworthy said. 

With Trump seemingly out of the way, there’s just one unresolved issue.  Former Republican Gubernatorial Candidate Carl Paladino’s threat to run for Governor on a fourth party line could derail any plans for party unity.  

“Really as Republicans, we’re down 3-million votes in New York State. We haven’t won since 2002 statewide. If we’re going to fight amongst ourselves we’re not going to have an opportunity to win the election,” said Langworthy.   

Ironically it was a primary challenge Langworthy helped author in 2010 that made Paladino a statewide figure, and Langworhty a rising star in the party.  Now, it appears, Langworthy will have the unenviable task of asking Paladino to stand down, and get behind the party prefered candidate.

“I would hope Carl could find a way to unite behind the Republican nominee and help us win the election. He’s a dear friend of mine. I know that he desperately wants to see a change in leadership in this state and he definitely wants to see Andrew Cuomo replaced as Governor,” Langworthy added.