Former Assemblyman Adam Clayton Powell IV is formally declaring his intention to run for a third time for the seat occupied by veteran Harlem Democratic Rep. Charlie Rangel, who has said the two-year term he is currently serving will be his last in Congress.

“This is not an exploratory committee,” Powell wrote in an email sent by his campaign committee just before 6 p.m. this evening. (Sort of strange timing, given the fact that much of the political world is prepping for the President’s State of the Union tonight and Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s State of the State/budget address tomorrow). “I’ve been exploring this district for over 20 years. It’s time to run.”

“I know this congressional district as well as anyone. From El Barrio to Harlem to Washington Heights & Inwood to the Bronx, I’ve represented various parts of this district in the City Council and in the State Assembly. Most of the leaders in these various neighborhoods are people I know and have worked with throughout the years. I hope you pray for me and join me in this exciting journey.”

Powell also noted his long-standing history with the district (albeit in a different, pre-redistricting configuration), pointing out his father, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., created the seat and served as New York’s first black member of Congress from 1944-1970 – the year he was ousted by Rangel.

“We need a progressive voice to preserve the rich history of these last 70 years,” Powell continued. I intend to run for that seat.”

This isn’t a big surprise. Powell recently told the NY Observer that he would likely take one more shot at a congressional run when the 84-year-old Rangel’s current term ends in 2016. He lost primary challenges to Rangel in 1996 and 2010, but endorsed him in 2012 and 2014 when the congressman fought off multiple primary challengers.

Powell, who is now a lobbyist, has said he believes he can win in the district despite the fact that a majority of its residents are now Latino.

It’s a safe bet that the race for Rangel’s seat – assuming he makes good on his pledge and does not seek re-election – will be quite crowded. Assemblyman Keith Wright, the Manhattan Democratic chairman, has long been mentioned as a potential Rangel replacement, and perhaps the top candidate in the congressman’s eyes, should he be able to select his own successor.

Also mentioned: Sen. Adriando Espaillat, who came close to beating Rangel in the 2012 and 2014 Democratic primaries; former Gov. David Paterson, Sen. Bill Perkins, NYC Councilwoman Inez Dickens, and the Rev. Michael Walrond, who ran in the 2014 primary and received 8 percent of the vote.