From the Morning Memo:

A top priority for Gov. Andrew Cuomo in the post-budget legislative session has been an effort to curtail rape and sexual assault at private college campuses, but state lawmakers continue to have questions over the proposal’s potential consequences.

The measure would codify what has already been in place last year for the SUNY system and be expanded to impact private-college campuses and, supporters say, make New York one of the most stringent states when it comes to handling rape and assault at institutions of higher education.

Law enforcement, including the State Police, would have a greater role in investigating allegations of rape and assault.

But with 12 days to go in the legislative session, lawmakers continue to press their concerns over the details of the proposal first made by Cuomo at the beginning of the year.

“Definitions are very important,” said Assemblywoman Deborah Glick, the chairwoman of the Assembly Higher Education Committee. “If things are too vague and not specific enough, that certainly leaves things open for misunderstanding, miscommunication and perhaps litigation. So, some of the concerns are around definitions.”

At the heart of the measure is provision that would require affirmative consent in sexual encounters. In an interview, Glick said the definitions of sexual encounters and interactions needs to be made as concise as possible.

“We want to make certain it’s fully understood what that means,” she said.

Along with the education investment tax credit and a plan to increase the age of criminal responsbility, the Enough Is Enough campaign has been a top, end-of-session priority for the governor after the passage of the state budget.

But working through the legal particulars of the plan has been a complicated task for state lawmakers already swamped with a number of nettlesome end-of-session issues.

Then there are concerns over whether the legislation would protect encounters involving those who gay, lesbian and transgender (Cuomo, a father of three teenage daughters, has frequently cited them when discussing the topic).

“We have to think broadly enough,” Glick said. “We want to make certain that people understand it’s also applied even handily to people who are LGBT — especially transgender youngsters.”

And there’s the issue of involving law enforcement — a provision included in the legislation so that college officials aren’t the only redress.

“Not everybody wants to proceed with a criminal case and we certainly don’t want to have young people live and repeat their story many, many times,” Glick said.

After Capital Tonight contacted Cuomo’s office to discuss the issues being raised, special advisor to the governor Christine Quinn in a phone interview responded the concerns.

Quinn said in the interview that she agrees “100 percent” with the concerns that if the legislation isn’t frame properly, sexual assault and rape will continue to plague campuses.

That being said, Quinn insisted the language is written so it is “completely inclusive” for all involved, including members of the LGBT community.

“Every unwanted sexual encounter, as is the case at SUNY, is covered,” Quinn said. “There are not particular sex acts that are not covered and sex acts that are covered — that is not the legislative case at all.”

Meanwhile, involving law enforcement remains an option, just not for the college administration.

“It is a survivor’s choice to go to the police,” Quinn said. “It is never government’s choice to mandate that. That does not take the power or the voice away from survivors. They have the right if they so choose to go to college police, local police or the state police. That decision rests with them 100 percent.”

As for the definition of affirmative consent in the legislation, Quinn said the language, which was already in place at large university centers like SUNY Albany, have been effective.

“We have seen it be a much more effective set of definitions than other college campuses that we have seen at other college campuses,” she said.

Though time is short with the legislative session ending on June 17, Quinn said she is “extraordinarily optimistic” the bill will be approved.

“This will be the toughest rape and sexual assault campus law in the country,” she said. “When we do it, we’ll get the rest of the states in the union to do and bring a greater level of safety to our college campuses.”