Incoming Senate Education Committee Chairman Carl Marcellino has backed a number of education-related bills over the years as well as measures designed to reform the Common Core standards and teacher evaluation system.

Marcellino on Friday was the announced appointment of Majority Leader John Flanagan to chair the education panel, which will take up a number of high-profile school-related issues in the remaining post-budget legislative session.

Marcellino in the last several weeks alone has introduced legislation dealing with the Common Core standards as well as the newly approved teacher evaluation regulations.

The evaluation bill would move the deadline for school districts to adopt the new evaluation criteria from November of this year to June 2017. The new requirements for the evaluation criteria wouldn’t be set until Jan. 31, 2017, under Marcellino’s bill.

“The current effective date of June 30, 2015 is simply unrealistic when you combine all the obstacles currently in the way of a successful process,” the bill memo states. “The obstacles include the lack of a current SED commissioner, the learning curve of newly confirmed members to the Board of Regents, the confusion amongst the Board relative to the adopted language, and growing opposition from both parents and education professionals.”

Under the measure approved in the budget, school districts must adopt the evaluation criteria by Nov. 15 or risk losing a boost in state education aid.

The Democratic-led Assembly has already passed a package bills that would extend the deadline for setting the evaluation criteria as well as unlinking the aid from the evaluation adoption.

Another Marcellino-backed measure would reform Common Core-based tests by providing test answers and questions to teachers.

In the legislative memorandum of support, Marcellino expresses sympathy for teachers administering Common Core-based tests.

“In recent months, parents and teachers have expressed the need for common core tests and results to be made available to the teachers who administer the exams,” the bill memo states. “These results can be helpful to teachers and students to improve and better understand their strengths and weaknesses regarding these exams.”

Marcellino’s introduction of these bills could give those in the education reform movement some pause: Flanagan, as education committee chairman, was seen as generally supportive of Common Core-based standards.

In a Facebook post earlier this year, Marcellino expressed opposition to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s education measures included in the budget.

“Let’s be clear. I do not support the Governor’s education reform proposals,” he wrote. “His plan is bad policy and bad for education. If it was up to me alone, these concepts would be off the table completely, but it takes the Senate, the Assembly and the Governor to craft a final budget. We must negotiate. Our Senate one house budget did not accept his plan and clearly states our intention to modify his flawed design.”

Marcellino has also been skeptical of efforts to tie an extension of mayoral control to New York City schools to rising the cap on charter schools statewide.

Other bills Marcellino has introduced would:

  • Require statements in the Board of Regents’ annual reports detailing total expenditures made by school districts
  • Require each school district to state what percentage of their expenses has gone toward instruction in an annual report card
  • Reduce the number of members on the Board of Regents to 13, with each representing an existing judicial district
  • Encourage school districts to install alternative energy systems such as solar, wind or geothermal.