A Democratic majority in the state Senate would make it easier for liberal and progressive causes to pass in Albany, Senate Minority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins said in her remarks to the New York delegation breakfast this morning.

“There is opportunity. And in terms of progressive leadership, because I know we’ve finished part of our progressive agenda, but there’s so much more to do,” she said. “We’ve got to take the state Senate back for the Democrats.”

Those victories, too, wouldn’t come with deals and strings attached Democrats have found difficult to accept, she said.

“We can do more than survive. We can grow, we can thrive,” she said. “We continue to lead the way, not by giving a little here and taking a lot there and, yes we believe in compromise and working across the aisle. But I don’t think fighting for working men and women should be a struggle.”

The speech was in many respects aimed as a pitch to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has worked well with majority Republicans in the Senate over the last six years. Cuomo gave Stewart-Cousins a leadership award at the breakfast before she spoke and acknowledged how the Democratic conference has a “frustrating situation” being in the minority.

The GOP conference has backed Cuomo’s push for a minimum wage increase for some parts of the state to $15 and a 12-week paid family leave program this year, with a tax-cut package coming along as part of the deal.

Democrats have long grumbled Cuomo does not want their party to control the Senate, believing he prefers the split Legislature in order to triangulate during negotiations.

Asked this week n Philadelphia, Cuomo once again declined to endorse a Democratic takeover of the Senate.

But Democrats in the Senate typically make gains in a presidential election years, and they are playing offense in districts on Long Island and in the Hudson Valley (Republicans want to flip a western New York seat as well as a district in Westchester County).

Stewart-Cousins, too, has sought to improve the relationship with the five-member Independent Democratic Conference, which has aligned with Senate Republicans.

Calling up Democratic lawmakers, Stewart-Cousins made a pointed plea for unity.

“I want you to understand that as we unify Democrats on the national level, we can unify Democrats on the state level,” she said. “I want you to understand we know how important as the governor said it’s hard to be dragged to be place when you don’t see the people, you don’t understand the problem.”

I want you to see them. I want you to understand that as we unify Democrats on the national level, we can unify Democrats on the state level. I want you to understand we know how important as the governor said it’s hard to be dragged to be place when you don’t see the people, you don’t understand the problem.

Let’s run the table.