The former Senate staffer who accused Independent Democratic Conference Leader Jeff Klein of forcibly kissing her in 2015 in a Facebook post called for people in power to be held accountable and fix a “broken system” that allows sexual harassment and misconduct to occur.

“This is only the first step,” she wrote in her first public comments since The Huffington Post reported on the allegation.

“Legislation geared towards supporting and protecting victims is needed; laws protecting staff from becoming victims are necessary. But legislation and rules can only go so far. It’s time to hold our elected officials accountable. I am willing to risk everything to help that happen. I am pleased to see calls for an independent investigation, and I am hopeful that it will not stop at this one incident, but attempt to overhaul a broken system where such a culture has been allowed to fester for decades.”

And Vladimer expressed solidarity with other people who have faced similar “Me Too” moments of harassment.

“If, after reading my story, you find yourself saying, “Me too,” please know that I am here for you. You do not have to go through this alone. Publicly or privately, together, we can move forward,” she wrote. “Together, we can point at those in power and remind them: Not me. Not anyone. Not anymore.”

Klein has denied the allegation.

The full post from Vladimer can be found after the jump.

I have been raised, guided and surrounded by strong women since I can remember. Not a day goes by where I am anything less than proud of the woman I have become because of them. I am strong because of them.

But almost three years ago, I let others crack the very foundation of that strength. Sen. Klein abused his power by violating my body, and ultimately my mind and soul. Sadly, my experience with sexual harassment in Albany was more insidious than this one moment in time with this one man. As a result, the Erica that instinctually protects others forgot how to do the same for herself, and was silenced: driven into darkness, confusion and – most horrifically – self-doubt. I didn’t speak my mind. I didn’t put him in his place. I didn’t come forward and say, “Not me, not anyone, not anymore.”

That ends today. Today, I choose to be the confident, driven, self-assured woman I know myself to be. Today, I use my voice. I can only hope that those who needed me to come forward sooner will forgive me that it took this long.

This is only the first step. Legislation geared towards supporting and protecting victims is needed; laws protecting staff from becoming victims are necessary. But legislation and rules can only go so far. It’s time to hold our elected officials accountable. I am willing to risk everything to help that happen. I am pleased to see calls for an independent investigation, and I am hopeful that it will not stop at this one incident, but attempt to overhaul a broken system where such a culture has been allowed to fester for decades.

If, after reading my story, you find yourself saying, “Me too,” please know that I am here for you. You do not have to go through this alone. Publicly or privately, together, we can move forward.

Together, we can point at those in power and remind them: Not me. Not anyone. Not anymore.