Gov. Andrew Cuomo is in New York City with no public events scheduled as of yet.

At 8:30 a.m., The Long Island Association is holding a Special Executive Breakfast featuring Rick Cotton, executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, 300 Broadhollow Road, Melville.

At 9 a.m., Assemblyman David Weprin speaks at Flushing Town Hall’s Legislative Breakfast, 137-35 Northern Blvd., Queens.

At 10 a.m., NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio will appear live on WNYC’s “The Brian Lehrer Show,” and will take questions from listeners.

At 10:30 a.m., the Assembly Committee on Libraries and Education Technology holds a public hearing on the role of state libraries in their communities, Roosevelt Hearing Room C, Legislative Office Building, second floor, Albany.

At 11:30 a.m., Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. and members of Speak Up For a Better Bronx collect petitions in support of the East Bronx Metro-North expansion plan, The Mall at Bay Plaza, 200 Baychester Ave., ground floor next to Santa Claus, Bronx.

At 1 p.m., Diaz speaks at the Bronx LGBTQ Business Convening, Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1040 Grand Concourse, the Bronx.

At 4 p.m., Rep. Adriano Espaillat leads the signing of agreements with CUNY, SUNY and the Dominican Republic, SUNY Global Center, 116 E. 55th St., Manhattan.

Headlines…

The legislative compensation commission recommended the first pay raises in 20 years for state legislators and top state officials — and the hike is hefty: $50,000.

The boost will make lawmakers the highest paid in the nation, but it comes with a price: Outside income will be curtailed to 15 percent of their overall salary, and many of the stipends for leadership posts and committee chairs – known as “lulus” in Albany-speak – will be eliminated.

A handful of stipends, like those paid to the Assembly speaker and Senate majority leader, would remain in place to reflect the added responsibility of those jobs, the panel said.

Also going up with this recommendation: Salaries for statewide elected officials, including the governor, who would see his pay increase to $250,000 over the next few years, making him the highest paid governor in the country. (This needs joint approval from the Senate and Assembly).

The commission’s recommendations, set to be issued in a formal report before Monday, have the force of law, according to a measure in this year’s state budget, unless the Legislature and governor pass a statute to void it before Jan. 1.

The NY Times editorial board called the compensation committee recommendation “real progress” in a state where two former legislative leaders – former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and former Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos – went to jail on corruption charges, Silver’s involving outside income.

NYPIRG’s Blair Horner said the commission “didn’t tackle the root causes of corruption in New York state government,” which he deemed a “mistake.”

President Donald Trump has reportedly settled on State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert to replace departing UN Ambassador Nikki Haley – an unusual choice, given that she had little experience in government or foreign policy before joining the administration in April 2017 after several years as an anchor and correspondent for Fox News.

The UN General Assembly rejected a resolution proposed by the United States to condemn the Islamic militant group Hamas for violence against Israel. The rejection was a blow to the American ambassador, Haley, who had positioned the measure as a capstone of her tenure.

Trump is reportedly strongly considering nominating William P. Barr, who served as attorney general during the first Bush administration from 1991 to 1993, to return for a second stint as head of the Justice Department.

A Manhattan federal judge has given the feds a hard deadline to weigh in on whether Trump’s disgraced former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, should go to jail for a litany of crimes, including lying to Congress about his dealings with the Russians.

The Trump administration detailed its plan to open nine million acres to drilling and mining by stripping away protections for the sage grouse, an imperiled ground-nesting bird that oil companies have long considered an obstacle to some of the richest deposits in the American West.

The Trump administration is expected to put forth a proposal next week that would significantly weaken a major Obama-era regulation on clean water, according to a talking points memo from the EPA that was distributed to White House allies this week.

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg held a series of private meetings with top Iowa Democrats this week during a multi-city swing through the first presidential state, a sign that the former New York City mayor is taking a hard look at a 2020 campaign.

Cuomo has unequivocally stated that he won’t be campaigning in 2020 in Iowa, where the presidential nomination process kicks off every four years. But his re-election campaign for governor in 2018, did pay nearly $280,000 to one of Iowa’s top Democratic political consultants, Jeff Link, campaign finance records show.

The NY Post editorial board: “Andrew Cuomo seems confused about corporations.”

After criticizing her colleagues for using unpaid interns, Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is promising to pay hers at least $15 an hour.

A federal judge sentenced Syracuse developer Joseph Gerardi to 30 months behind bars and a $500,000 fine for his role in a bid-rigging scheme that brought more than $100 million in state construction work to Gerardi’s firm, Cor Development Co., federal officials confirmed.

The NYC Council put its political clout behind a proposal in Albany to overhaul state health care by creating a “Medicare for all” program that would raise taxes by $139 billion a year.

NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio met for the first time in a face-to-face meeting with HUD Secretary Ben Carson in Washington. The meeting lasted more than an hour, and the two men discussed the city’s crumbling public housing.

“Secretary Carson said that HUD would work closely with the city and the Housing Authority to ensure residents’ health and safety,” a de Blasio spokesperson said. “The mayor and secretary agreed to continue their dialogue in the coming days.”

A judge has ruled he will further investigate a Nxivm defense fund that prosecutors claim was set up by Seagram heiress Clare Bronfman to keep her fellow cult members in line.

A lawsuit is claiming the NYPD forced a woman to give birth while shackled in handcuffs.

An NYPD cop fired the shots that injured a 12-year-old girl and left a 46-year-old woman in severe condition during a wild shootout in the Bronx, police sources said.

The new head of the NYPD’s sex-crimes unit — which the Department of Investigation skewered for poor staffing and training — said she’ll know she’s doing a good job if the number of reported rapes go up.

New York City Transit head Andy Byford has hired Pete Tomlin – whom the MTA calls an “internationally renowned signaling expert” – to head up the massive signaling work that has to be done as a part of the decade-long Fast Forward project.

Constant delays make it seem as if the NYC subway system has gone to pot. Now former NYC Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito wants to use taxes from legal pot to pay for system repairs.

Some stock brokers are complaining that that NYSE, in an unusual move last week, gave special treatment to a broker at Morgan Stanley who asked to trade large blocks of stocks for several minutes after the markets closed.

The statue of Christopher Columbus standing atop a column in Manhattan, which some recently wanted removed altogether, has been added to the National Register of Historic Places, Cuomo announced.

Cuomo must decide by the end of today whether or not to enact legislation that would force utility companies to reveal locations of their underground gas leaks.

The New York City police officer who placed Eric Garner in a chokehold will face a disciplinary trial in May, nearly five years after the death of the unarmed African-American man.

A Jewish Queens city councilwoman, Karen Koslowitz, was sent a hate-filled, anti-Semitic letter that makes a reference to the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre.

Contractors are considering using explosives to bring down a damaged section of the old Tappan Zee Bridge in a controlled demolition, according to a federal official.

Up to 115,000 New Yorkers could be pushed into poverty if the federal government approves proposed changes to the public charge rule, according to the Robin Hood Foundation.

Republican Rep. John Faso has just under a month to go before he leaves office, but he’s already homeless on Capitol Hill, because his suite in the Longworth building adjacent to the U.S. Capitol has been given to a new incoming member.

It is not a crime to run away from foster care. But in Family Court hearings each week, NYC is getting arrest warrants for children who do.

The CBS show “60 Minutes” proved unable to prevent inappropriate conduct by some of its top executives, according to lawyers hired by the CBS Corporation board of directors to investigate the workplace culture of the program.

Republican Stefan I. Mychajliw Jr., the Erie County comptroller who all but declared his candidacy for county executive earlier this year, said he will not oppose incumbent Democrat Mark C. Poloncarz in 2019, because he wants to be ready to run for Congress – should a vacancy occur in NY-27.

Anger and arguments among Erie County legislators gave way to an 8-3 vote to adopt a $1.53 billion county budget for next year that included an amendment to further reduce county spending, but not nearly as much as some Republican-supported legislators hoped.

The Troy City Council met last night to vote on the sanctuary city resolution. But, after a two hour community hearing, lawmakers decided to table the resolution, with the vote 6-1.

Ten of Buffalo’s most struggling schools all showed enough improvement last year to stay out of the state’s crosshairs. In fact, district officials hope the progress being made by at least some of these schools will be enough to get them off of a state watch list by the end of this academic year.

The town’s Board of Ethics reviewed and dismissed a complaint by former Niskayuna Police Chief Lewis Moskowitz against Board Member Denise Murphy McGraw for voting to renew a contract with Proctors Theater, a client of her lobbying firm, to broadcast town meetings.

Onondaga County Executive Ryan McMahon has appointed a three-person volunteer panel to help him select the next county comptroller.

Net income for New York farmers has declined dramatically in recent years, due to a number of factors. Despite that, they managed to donate an estimated 11 million pounds of food to regional food banks this year.

A dental office near Rochester is facing criticism after a mother said a dentist there “shamed” her for attempting to breastfeed her infant while her older child was in the exam chair.

Students at famed LaGuardia HS in Manhattan revolted this week after Nazi props were prohibited from a new production of “The Sound of Music.”

CNN evacuated its offices in Manhattan’s Columbus Circle after a bomb threat last night.

Kevin Hart said that he’s stepping down from hosting the 2019 Oscars — just two days after getting the gig — in the wake of criticism over a series of homophobic tweets he posted years ago.