Chris Gibson

Paladino: “Collision Courses Are Good In Government”

Carl Paladino didn’t waste a chance to take a dig at one of his potential competitors, if he’s serious about another run for Governor in 2018.

“I’m always in campaign season. I’m the same way now that I’ll be two years from now when we’re actually running,” Paladino said.

On Bill Samuels Effective Radio show Sunday Paladino accused Rep. Chris Gibson, R-Rockville Center, of having “Washinton-itis.” He elaborated Monday saying he’s been disappointed with how Gibson has voted, particularly on budget bills.

“I told him privately that I was very upset with what he had done. I wrote him a note and I told him that,” he said.

Gibson’s office declined to comment on the criticism. Paladino said he’s not done speaking his mind about the congressman and he encouraged him to return the favor.

“Collision courses are good in government, okay. We should have a lot more of them. They should stop trying to dance together and start being adversaries as to properly vet out what they’re doing,” Paladino said.

 

 

 

 

 

Gibson Decries ‘Pageantry’ Of State Of The State

Rep. Chris Gibson, a Republican who is considering a potential run for governor in 2018, said he hopes whoever occupies the post next does the State of the State differently than Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s presentation on Wednesday.

Gibson criticized Cuomo for delivering the address in the Empire State Plaza Convention Center, where the event was moved the first year the governor took office in 2011.

Traditionally, the annual address was delivered in the Assembly chamber.

“This set of remarks needs to be presented before the peoples’ chamber,” Gibson said in an interview on Talk-1300.

Gibson was also critical of the laudatory 10-minute video shown before Cuomo’s speech produced by the governor’s office that touted his time in office.

“I would start with this pageantry,” Gibson said. “It reminds of the Hunger Games. We get a 10-minute video, just applauding.”

And Gibson knocked Cuomo for proposing limits on outside income for state elected officials while the governor himself received a $700,000 for a memoir.

“It just galls me that a guy who makes all this outside money, stands before the people we ought to do this,” Gibson said, adding he would considering backing such a measure. “He should go first.”

Gibson: NY Republicans Need To Reach Out

gibsonAs he considers a run for governor in 2018, Republican Rep. Chris Gibson said the GOP in New York has to reach out to Democrats and independent voters if it wants to win their first statewide election since 2002.

Gibson was reacting to President Obama’s final State of the Union address on Tuesday night, but his talk turned toward New York issues and concerns about corruption in Albany.

“A lot of folks are very upset with the level of corruption in Albany and I think there’s significant reform that’s needed there as well,” Gibson said.

Gibson is one of several Republicans believed to be considering a run for governor in 2018. Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino, the party’s 2014 nominee, has not ruled out a second bid. Rockland County Executive Ed Day is in the mix, as is Harry Wilson, a Westchester County businessman who ran for state comptroller in 2010.

Carl Paladino, the Buffalo businessman and Donald Trump supporter who ran and insurgent campaign for the GOP’s nomination in 2010, has said he intends to run in 2018 as well.

Asked about Paladino’s potential campaign, Gibson seemingly questioned whether Paladino can unite not just the party, but other New Yorkers as well in this very blue state.

“I think we have a big tent. Anyone can run,” Gibson said. “I think the real challenge is: Who can unite? Who can rally? Can we rally the Republican side? And, so importantly, can we reach out? Can we rally the base and get independents and Democrats to come with us? If you’re going to run in a state 2-to-1, you certainly have to get broader support.”

Gibson is retiring from his Hudson Valley congressional seat at the end of the year. In the meantime, he has been traveling the state to build support for a potential gubernatorial campaign.

Gibson Concerned About Commander-in-Chief Trump

From today’s Morning Memo:

Retiring Rep. Chris Gibson, who has been mentioned as a potential GOP gubernatorial contender in 2018, isn’t jumping on the Donald Trump-for-president bandwagon, saying he doesn’t like the idea of making the billionaire real estate developer head of the US armed services.

“I have concerns about giving that guy an army,” Gibson, a retired Army colonel whose close to three decades in uniform included four tours of duty in Iraq. “As someone who served for 29 years, I have concerns given what I’ve heard to date about what his temperament and the judgement he has.”

Gibson’s comments, made during an appearance yesterday on AM970’s “Effective Radio With Bill Samuels,” come as other Republicans in New York – most notably Buffalo businessman and 2010 GOP gubernatorial candidate Carl Paladino, are ratcheting up efforts to assist Trump in winning New York’s April 19, 2016 presidential primary.

Gibson is one of two self-styled moderate Republican members of New York’s congressional delegation who are departing the House at the end of next year. Rep. Richard Hanna recently announced he also will be forgoing a re-election bid (in NY-22) in 2016.

Unlike Gibson, however, Hanna isn’t looking to run for any other office, saying he merely wants to depart the increasingly divisive atmosphere in D.C. to spend more time with his family.

In recent months, Gibson has stepped up his comments – and criticism – of New York politics and policy as he mulls whether to launch a statewide bid in 2018, potentially against Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo, whose team insists he’ll be seeking a third term.

Also during his interview with Samuels, Gibson said he supports a Constitutional Convention in 2017, saying “we clearly need reform in this state.”

He also accused the governor of “demonizing” teachers and “moving down the wrong path” on standardized testing, though Cuomo has recently done an about-face on that issue, most notably calling – through his latest reform task force – for a moratorium on linking test results and teacher performance evaluations.

During this same interview with Samuels, Gibson also weighed in on raises for state lawmakers. He’s not a fan, though he probably won’t have much of a say in the matter, since a commission quietly created in this last budget deal will be making recommendations on the issue next year.

Gibson did reiterate his support for term limits, for which he has long been an outspoken advocate.

Also worth noting, the TU’s Chris Churchill sat down recently with Gibson in the congressman’s Kinderhook home to try to determine whether a statewide victory for a Republican is possible – particularly against Cuomo. Gibson insists it is, though he acknowledged the path is “very narrow.”

Gibson Says He’s ‘Looking Very Seriously’ At Run For Governor With Reform Agenda

Chris GibsonRepublican Rep. Chris Gibson on Wednesday said he is “very seriously” considering a run for governor in 2018, faulting Democratic incumbent Andrew Cuomo on a variety of issues ranging from corruption in state government to his handling of the New York economy.

“I look at the possibilities in terms of the economy in New York state, so much more could be done on that score and I look at the corruption in Albany,” Gibson said in a radio interview with WCNY’s The Captiol Pressroom. “We cannot accept that. I run into constituents who say, well, that’s the way it is. We cannot accept that.”

He added his military experience would make him well-equipped to handle the often obtuse customs and processes of state government and enable to get the Legislature to act on his agenda.

“My experience in the military, when you want to get something difficult done, the commander has to go first,” Gibson said.

Gibson pledged to serve two terms if elected and sign a bill that would ban the practice of single donors giving unlimited funds through a network of limited liability companies. More >

Gibson: DiNapoli Should Investigate Health Republic Closure (Updated)

Comptroller Tom DiNapoli should investigate the closure of Health Republic, a co-op in the state’s health exchange that has struggled financially, Rep. Chris Gibson on Thursday said in a conference call with reporters.

Gibson sharply criticized the Cuomo administration for oversight at the exchange and said he was concerned other co-ops formed as part of the Affordable Care Act have run into similar trouble seen with Health Republic.

“If this trend continues it’s going to be very destabilizing for the entire market,” he said. “We need to know what happened.”

He also called on the governor’s office “to more engaged, immediately” on the issue.

“This is a state program that the federal taxpayers have made significant investments,” Gibson said.

Updated: Department of Financial Services spokesman Matt Anderson in response said the administration has “been working day and night, around-the-clock to address this situation and protect consumers.

The company’s finances were substantially worse than it reported to the State in its filings, which made this action the only responsible decision.”

While commenting on the ostensible federal issue of the health-care law, he was also dipping his toe into state issues and stepping up his criticism of Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

A three-term Hudson Valley lawmaker, Gibson is considering a run for governor in 2018 after his planned retirement from the House of Representatives in 2016.

His call for DiNapoli to investigate the co-op’s failure is a savvy one: The Democratic comptroller has been at odds with Cuomo over the years on a variety of issues.

“Our comptroller, Tom DiNapoli, he’s somebody given his service to date, having him look at this from an independent perspective and looking at the financials and providing the people of New York a report I think would be very welcome,” Gibson said.

Health Republic Insurance of New York has 150,000 customers, including 83,000 individuals who enrolled through the state this year. They will now have to find new insurance polices for next year.

The state has enrolled about one in five individuals since the 2013 law took effect, along with one in three small businesses that enrolled through the insurance marketplace have a Health Republic-based plan.

State officials said the insurance plans will be honored through the end of calendar-year 2015 through Nov. 30. Enrollees will then be able to find new insurance next year during the open enrollment period starting Nov. 1.

In addition to firing a salvo at the state for its handling of the exchange, Gibson also knocked the Affordable Care Act writ large.

“Let’s recognize the Affordable Care Act is failing,” Gibson said. “This is 50 percent of the co-ops that have failed us.”

Gibson To Raise Concerns Over Health Republic

Republican Rep. Chris Gibson on Thursday will hold a press call to raise concerns with Health Republic, a non-profit co-op that was part of the New York state’s health exchange, but has since shutdown.

In a statement, Gibson noted that 20,000 of his constituents are impacted by the premium increases in the 19th congressional district, but it is also another step into a state issue as he considers a likely run for governor in 2018.

“While I am a longtime opponent of the Affordable Care Act, this is an incredible disappointment,” said Gibson, who is stepping down from Congress at the end of the current term. “I will continue to partner with my colleagues from both parties to see that state and federal regulators take action to mitigate the effects of these failed policies. I also want more answers on New York State’s Department of Financial Services’ regulatory oversight of Health Republic.”

The Department of Financial Services announced Health Republic, formed as part of the Affordable Care Act, would close at the end of the year due to its increasingly shaky financial situation.

Health Republic Insurance of New York has 150,000 customers, including 83,000 individuals who enrolled through the state this year. They will now have to find new insurance polices for next year.

The state has enrolled about one in five individuals since the 2013 law took effect, along with one in three small businesses that enrolled through the insurance marketplace have a Health Republic-based plan.

State officials said the insurance plans will be honored through the end of calendar-year 2015. Enrollees will then be able to find new insurance next year during the open enrollment period starting Nov. 1.

Gibson: Trump’s Comments ‘Distasteful’

Republican U.S. Rep. Chris Gibson on Monday called comments made by Donald Trump deriding Arizona Sen. John McCain’s time in captivity “distasteful” and “way out of bounds.”

“As a veteran myself and someone who commanded men and women in combat, I find his comments very distasteful,” Gibson said. “A day doesn’t go by I don’t think about those young Americans, those paratroopers, who I lost.”

Trump, who launched his presidential bid earlier this summer, blasted McCain over the weekend, calling him not a war hero.

“He is a war hero because he was captured,” Trump said a GOP forum. “I like people that weren’t captured, OK? I hate to tell you.”

Trump was reacting to McCain’s suggestion that the real-estate mogul and reality TV star had been “stirring up the crazies” through his anti-immigration rhetoric.

“John McCain — you say whatever you want about his politics — that’s someone who spent 5-1/2 years in a prison camp, was offered to come home early,” Gibson said. His comments were way out of bounds and that is just totally distasteful.”

Asked if Trump should apologize — something he has yet to do — Gibson said the candidate should dial back the rhetoric when it comes to veterans.

“I would say that going forward I would hope that he would show the proper respect for all veterans,” he said.

Gibson Says He Backs ‘Equal Protection’

Republican Rep. Chris Gibson’s office on Friday released a carefully worded statement on his same-sex marriage position following his backing an amicus brief in support of striking down bans in several states.

In the statement, Gibson separated “the rights of religious groups” to recognize marriages versus equal protection.

He does not specifically say whether he supports full marriage rights for gay and lesbian couples, a matter that the U.S. Supreme Court is considering the constitutionality of in Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee.

“Equal protection under the law and religious freedom are two of the most fundamental and critical principles enshrined in our founding documents,” said Congressman Gibson. “I have consistently advocated for equal protection under the law for those who seek to certify their unions in the face of the law. Furthermore, it is a matter of religious liberty that the rights of religious groups to perform and recognize these unions not be hampered by civil law. I believe that, in the end, the courts will settle this matter on the side of our Constitution’s religious freedoms and equal protection clauses.”

Gibson, along with several other hundred Republican office holders, former elected officials and operatives backed a friend-of-the-court brief that urged the Supreme Court to strike down the bans.

Gibson in 2014 said he supported civil unions for gay couples.

“I have said, always, that we should have civil unions for all,” he said during a public television debate. “Marriage should be left to religious institutions.”

He is due to retire at the end of the current term, in 2016, as he considers a statewide run for office.

Gibson is considered one of the more moderate to liberal Republicans in the GOP-controlled House of Representatives.

Gibson Signs On To Brief Backing Same-Sex Marriage (Updated)

As the U.S. Supreme Court weighs a case that could strike down same-sex marriage bans nationally, Republican Chris Gibson signed on this week to a friend-of-the-court brief that makes a conservative case for legalization.

Gibson backed the brief, signed by 300 other Republican office holders and operatives — including fellow upstate GOP Rep. Richard Hanna — as he considers a statewide run for office after his planned departure from Congress in 2016.

The three-term incumbent from the Hudson Valley successfully won his re-election bid last year defeating Democrat Sean Eldridge.

Eldridge, who is married to Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, was one of the prominent supporters of the marriage law that passed in New York in 2011.

During the campaign, Gibson said he was supportive of civil unions, but not full marriage rights for gay and lesbian couples.

Still, Gibson in 2013 appeared to be pivoting to the left on issues like gay rights.

That year, Gibson backed a measure that would have banned workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity.

The brief Gibson signed on to this week makes a conservative, limited-government case for same-sex marriage rights as the Supreme Court considers the legality of bans in Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee.

In a debate with Eldridge on Time Warner Cable News last year, Gibson told his challenger he respected the work he did on pushing for New York’s same-sex marriage law.

“Let me just say, I do respect your work on that,” Gibson said, “and I’m surprised you don’t talk more about it, because that’s the little experience that you have.”

In a separate debate on public television, Gibson said he backed civil unions for same-sex couples.

“I have said, always, that we should have civil unions for all,” he said at the time. “Marriage should be left to religious institutions.”

Updated: Gibson in a statement says he supports “equal protection” rights.

“Equal protection under the law and religious freedom are two of the most fundamental and critical principles enshrined in our founding documents,” said Congressman Gibson. “I have consistently advocated for equal protection under the law for those who seek to certify their unions in the face of the law. Furthermore, it is a matter of religious liberty that the rights of religious groups to perform and recognize these unions not be hampered by civil law. I believe that, in the end, the courts will settle this matter on the side of our Constitution’s religious freedoms and equal protection clauses.”