The Independent Democratic Conference will form a new power-sharing coalition in the state Senate with the mainline conference after the November elections, a move that’s supported by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and a coalition of liberal organizations and labor groups.

The announcement signals an end to the IDC’s power-sharing agreement with Senate Republicans in the chamber, which began in the aftermath of the 2012 elections with the GOP in a numerical minority.

In the statement, Klein, a Bronx Democrat, touted the accomplishments of his five-member faction, but added he wants to see a package of liberal friendly legislation pass in the chamber that has been not supported by Republican lawmakers.

Klein pointed to the January 2013 gun control law and the hike in the state’s minimum wage, along with the legalization of medical marijuana as IDC-GOP accomplishments.

“Yet as we reflect on these past achievements, it is also clear that core Democratic policy initiatives that the IDC championed remain unfinished,” Klein said in a statement. “As Democrats, the IDC remains committed to the fight for an equal education for all New York students – which the Dream Act would provide, protecting a woman’s right to choose, increasing workers’ wages, and enacting meaningful campaign finance reform. I agree with Governor Cuomo that these are progressive priorities we must pass.”

Without any caveats, Klein said his conference now backs a new coalition with Democrats, led by Senate Minority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins.

“Therefore all IDC members are united and agree to work together to form a new majority coalition between the Independent Democratic Conference and the Senate Democratic Conference after the November elections in order to deliver the results that working families across this state still need and deserve,” Klein said.

In the same statement, Cuomo — who liberal advocates have accused of tacitly endorsing the power-sharing agreement that left Republicans in charge of the chamber — praised the move.

“I applaud the IDC’s decision. There is no doubt that we have accomplished much for the state over the past four years. We have transformed the state government from dysfunctional to highly functional, a deficit to a surplus, and losing jobs to gaining jobs. There is also no doubt there are progressive goals that we have yet to achieve and that we must accomplish next January,” he said.

The power-sharing agreement is the fruition of behind-the-scenes negotiations with Cuomo, labor leaders and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on control of the Senate.

Key labor groups part of the effort to flip the Senate released separate statements praising the announcement.

Stewart-Cousins also released a statement thanking Cuomo and de Blasio, as well as her members.

“There is much work to be done between now and January. We commit ourselves to focusing on that work and doing our best to serve the people of New York in a way that will make them proud,” she said.

Under the agreement, Klein and Stewart-Cousins would share power as co-leaders in the Senate.

In a statement, the WFP praised the news as a chance to pass long-sought liberal measures.

‎”Today’s announcement that the IDC will be reuniting with Senate Democrats to form a new progressive majority in the State Senate is great news for working families throughout New York,” said State Director Bill Lipton. “From public financing and the full women’s equality agenda to the DREAM Act and raising the minimum wage, we now have a tidal wave of momentum to finally pass these critical pieces of legislation. We look forward to working with Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins, Senator Jeff Klein and a new progressive majority next year, and to growing that majority this November.”

From public financing and the full women’s equality agenda to the DREAM Act and raising the minimum wage, we now have a tidal wave of momentum to finally pass these critical pieces of legislation.

We look forward to working with Senator Andrew Stewart-Cousin, Senator Jeff Klein and a new progressive majority next year, and to growing that majority this November.”

Cuomo last month received the endorsement of the labor-backed Working Families Party and agreed to help Democrats retake control of the chamber, which they held for a brief, two-year term marked by chaos and dysfunction.

Mainline Democrats have pointed out that a number of the lawmakers who caused headaches in the Senate — Pedro Espada, Carl Krueger, Hiram Monserrate among them — are no longer sitting lawmakers.

Questions remain, of course.

At least two members of the IDC are facing primary challenges this fall: Klein is being challenged by former city Councilman Oliver Koppell and Queens Sen. Tony Avella faces former City Comptroller John Liu.

Sen. David Valesky of the Syracuse area, meanwhile, faces a potential challenge from Democrat Jean Kessner.

All of the primary challenges have hinged, at least in part, on the lawmakers’ membership in the IDC and alliance with Senate Republicans.

The announcement today also seems to rely on the expectation that Democrats will make gains in the Senate — a non-presidential election year that is usually marked by lower Democratic turnout in New York.

The labor-backed coalition has pledged to help Democrats win seats this fall.

In the short term, the announcement today changes very little.

Lawmakers concluded the legislative session last week, earning the praise of Cuomo.

Barring a special session, they aren’t due to return to Albany for the remainder of the year, and the Senate rules can’t be changed until after new lawmakers are seated.

Joint Statement Formatted FINAL (2) by Nick Reisman