Embattled Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver has bowed to pressure coming from both from his own members and outside his Democratic conference and agreed to cede control of the chamber while he battles the legal charges against him, a spokesman confirmed.

“The Speaker is not stepping down,” Silver spokesman Michael Whyland insisted in a statement released late yesterday. “He is appointing a group of senior members to undertake various responsibilities such as budget negotiations to ensure a timely spending plan for the state.”

“This will give him the flexibility he needs so that he can defend himself against these charges, and he is confident that he will be found innocent.”

According to the Daily News, which first reported the deal, the five members are: Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle, of Rochester: Ways and Means Committee Chairman Denny Farrell, of Manhattan; Queens Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan, who chairs the Education Committee; Brooklyn Assemblyman Joe Lentol, chair of the Codes Committee; and Assemblyman Carl Heastie, who does double duty as chair of the Bronx Democratic Party.

Whyland said Silver will not be relinquishing his title as speaker.

The agreement came at the end of a weekend of furious behind-the-scenes maneuvering in which Silver’s members, many of whom pronounced their continued support of him following his arrest on corruption charges late last week, increasingly questioned his ability to lead in what’s shaping up to be a difficult budget season.

As newspaper editorial boards called for Silver to resign his leadership post, the speaker initially dug in, refusing to do so. He was benefitted by the fact that he has no clear successor and – clearly, given the nature of this deal – no consensus among his membership as to who, if anyone, should replace him.

Each of the five-member leadership team has been mentioned as a potential Silver successor, with Farrell and Lentol – both veteran members and longtime Silver loyalists – floated as so-called “caretakers” who might lead until the conference could agree on a long-term replacement.

Nolan was floated last week by the Queens Democratic Party, which has managed to consolidate power by having almost all of its 18 members hang together to vote in a bloc.

As majority leader, Morelle is technically next in line should Silver step down. He is well-liked inside the conference, but the fact that he hails from upstate and is close to Gov. Andrew Cuomo had been seen as a detriment to observers trying to game out the speakership race in recent days.

Heastie, who ostensibly controls 11 votes as Bronx Democratic chairman, has long been mentioned as a potential Silver successor, along with Assemblyman Keith Wright, chair of the Manhattan Democratic Party.

Both Heastie and Wright are African American, and would make history as the first black leader of a majority legislative conference if they were to rise to the position of speaker. Similarly, Nolan would be the first woman to hold the post.

(In December 2012, Senate Minority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins became the first black woman ever to hold a legislative leadership at the state Capitol. Former Senate Minority Leader/Gov. David Paterson, who is also black, was the first to break the color barrier when he was the first non-white member elected to head the Democratic conference in the Senate in November 2002).

Wright is the lone member seriously mentioned as a potential Silver successor who was not included in the five-member leadership team.

According to Capital NY, none of the five members who will be taking charge of the chamber have commented on their new roles.

The division of power and responsibilities has not yet been explained, though the NY Post reported that Morelle and Farrell, who, as Ways and Means Committee chair has long headed up budget debates and hearings for the Democrats, will be overseeing budget negotiations.

This power-sharing idea still has to pass muster with the rest of the conference, and there’s been at least one report that rank-and-file members are skeptical the idea will work.

Silver is scheduled to meet with the conference later this morning for the first time since his arrest. A number of downstate members traveled to Albany last night to get ahead of the massive snowstorm that is scheduled to hit New York City and move northward.

The Assembly is expected to go into session in the afternoon, and Democrats have been worried that the Republicans might try to force a procedural vote on Silver, putting members on the record in a way that could be used against them in the next election cycle.