Senate Democrats on Monday pushed for a vote in the Senate Elections Committee that would reclassify limited liability companies and limit their political giving.

Sen. Daniel Squadron, the bill’s main sponsor, used a parliamentary maneuver in order to have a measure put to a vote in a legislative committee.

The measure was approved, and is now before the Senate’s corporations committee.

At the moment, a single campaign donor can give unlimited contributions through a network of limited liability companies or LLCs.

“It seems like almost everyday new allegations of corruption and abuse of the public trust are leveled at state government,” said Senate Minority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins at a news conference this morning.

“What does it say when the Senate Republicans are so opposed to ethics reforms that they have to be forced to even discuss these bills in committee?”

The nudging is subtle: Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos is under investigation by federal prosecutors, while the GOP’s deputy majority leader, Tom Libous, is under indictment for lying to the FBI.

More broadly, Democratic Assemblyman Sheldon Silver is under indictment for corruption charges and will be arraigned on a superseding indictment on Tuesday.

Good-government groups have long railed against the so-called LLC loophole, but for the moment the classification has been elusive in changing.

The state Board of Elections earlier this month had considered a change in the regulation, but the commissioners deadlocked in a vote.

Republican commissioners argued at the time it should up to the Legislature to change the regulation. The Board of Elections initially opened up the LLC giving based on a federal ruling that has since been overturned.

“The Board of Elections opened up this loophole through their own action,” Squadron said. “It was consistent At the time, the federal government quickly corrected that. The Board of Elections has failed to act. The New York State Legislature has failed to act. We’ve seen this loophole get bigger and bigger.”

Candidates on both sides of the political aisle have benefited from the arrangement, though Gov. Andrew Cuomo has raked in the lion’s share of the contributions.

Nevertheless, Cuomo himself has been pushing to have the loophole closed.

“The Governor supports and will continue to fight for closing the LLC loophole,” said spokesman Rich Azzopardi. “Today’s passage of legislation out the Senate Elections Committee that would accomplish this goal is a positive development and one that we hope ends with an actual vote and passage from the full Senate.”