Republican John Faso and Democrat Zephyr Teachout are in a virtual tie in the race for the 19th congressional district in the Hudson Valley, a Time Warner Cable News/Siena College poll found.

The poll released Tuesday night shows Faso, a former Assembly minority leader, drawing 43 percent of the vote, with Teachout receiving 42 percent of support.

The results are not wholly unexpected: The 19th congressional district is considered one of the key battleground House races in New York and already is drawing a heavy rotation in television advertising for both candidates.

But the poll results underscore the unsettled nature of the race an open congressional seat that’s being vacated by Rep. Chris Gibson, a Republican.

Both Faso and Teachout are known quantities in some regard.

Faso, a longtime state lawmaker turned lobbyist, ran for governor as the Republican nominee in 2006. The poll found 32 percent of voters hold a favorable view of him, while 30 percent do not. Teachout, who ran for the Democratic nomination for governor against incumbent Andrew Cuomo in 2014, has a 36 percent to 25 percent favorable rating.

But a large swath of voters — nearly 40 percent — have not heard enough about either candidate to form an opinion with six weeks to go before Election Day.

Though the race is considered a tossup, Republicans fare better in other races.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump leads Democrat Hillary Clinton in the district by 5 percentage points, 43 percent to 38 percent.

And while Sen. Chuck Schumer holds a comfortable lead over his little known Republican challenger Wendy Long, it is more narrow in the 19th district than in broader statewide polls.

At the same time, most voters in the district by a margin of 46 percent to 41 percent want Republicans to retain control of the House of Representatives this November.

So, why does Faso still struggle to overcome Teachout in the race?

The answer lies with independent voters: Faso and Teachout are tied with those not registered as Democrats or Republicans, 42 percent to 41 percent, the poll found.

At the same time, the poll shows these voters lean conservative. Among the independent voters polled, 66 percent support Second Amendment rights, 56 percent back repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, and on the role of the federal government, 53 percent believe it should less its burden on businesses.

The poll of 678 likely voters was conducted from Sept. 20 through Sept. 22. It has a margin of error of 3.8 percentage points.

CD190916 Crosstabs938 by Nick Reisman on Scribd