Democratic Rep. Louise Slaughter, one of the most powerful and prominent members of Congress from upstate New York, has died at the age of 88, her office announced Friday morning.

She died at George Washington University following a fall at her residence in Washington, D.C. last week.

Her chief of staff, Liam Fitzsimmons, said in a statement that to have known Slaughter “is to have known a force of nature.”

“She was a relentless advocate for Western New York whose visionary leadership brought infrastructure upgrades, technology and research investments, and two federal manufacturing institutes to Rochester that will transform the local economy for generations to come,” he said. “As the first chairwoman of the House Rules Committee, Louise blazed a path that many women continue to follow. It is difficult to find a segment of society that Louise didn’t help shape over the course of more than thirty years in Congress, from health care to genetic nondiscrimination to historic ethics reforms. The Slaughter family is incredibly grateful for all the support during this difficult time. Details on funeral arrangements will be provided when they are available.”

Her death drew bipartisan mourning, including from Monroe County Republican Chairman Bill Reilich.

“At this difficult time, I want to first and foremost express my deepest condolences to Congresswoman Louise Slaughter’s family,” he said. “She has long served her constituents with strength and passion and as a senior member in Congress is responsible for many initiatives and has secured both funding and support for many critical issues.”

Republican Rep. Tom Reed also offered his condolences.

“She has long served her constituents with strength and passion and as a senior member in Congress is responsible for many initiatives and has secured both funding and support for many critical issues,” said Reed, who represents a neighboring upstate district.

Democratic Assemblyman Joe Morelle, a former county Democratic chairman, said the country is mourning Slaughter’s death as well.

“For nearly 50 years, Louise Slaughter was a tireless advocate for our community and one of our nation’s most fearless champions for fairness, equality, and justice. Her work and legacy will forever be an inspiration to me and I am truly honored to have had the opportunity to call her my friend and partner in public service,” he said.