Long-sought bills for election reform are being passed today and Gov. Andrew Cuomo is expected to sign them.

But the process is something of a change from previous years in which big picture, headline-making measures were included in the budget, modified in negotiation and approved or taken out of the final day.

This time, lawmakers are approving longtime bills re-introduced each year. No leaders meetings with Cuomo appear to be being held. Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins and Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie worked out many of the details for the votes themselves.

But Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie told reporters at the Capitol Monday this wasn’t about cutting Cuomo out of the law-making picture.

“The governor has the right to put whatever he wants in the budget,” Heastie said. “I would say in previous times it was probably more of a necessity because of the Republican Senate because that was the best way to get things done. The Senate didn’t really agree with a Democratic governor and a Democratic Assembly.”

At the same time, the legislative process still was a process when Republicans controlled the Senate, like when the Legislature approved the creation of a prosecutorial conduct panel last year.

“Even when there was a Republican Senate, there were a lot of bills the Assembly passed,” Heastie said. “That doesn’t mean we’re not going to engage the governor. We’re passing bills we know that we people in the state have wanted for numerous years.”

Cuomo already has signaled an aggressive budget with policies like banning plastic bags, expanding the bottle deposits, increasing the legal age to buy tobacco products to 21 and new regulations for e-cigarettes.

And the budget’s biggest items — health care and education spending — will still have the governor’s stamp on the final deal.

But at the same time, lawmakers are taking up a package of measures virtually every session day, including gun control, LGBTQ rights and more.

“Our objective is not to do things quickly,” Stewart-Cousins said, “but to do them right.”