Single-use beverage containers manufactured or sold at the wholesale or retail level in New York should be composed of at least 75 percent recycle materials by the middle of the next decade, according to a bill introduced this week by Assemblywoman Pat Fahy.

The bill would phase in the requirement over the next six years and is meant to reduce the amount of plastic used in consumer items, which have been attributed to a pollution crisis in the world’s oceans.

“Single-use plastics contribute to climate change, create unnecessary waste, and are rarely recycled,” said Julie Tighe, the president of the New York League of Conservation Voters. “Requiring that single-use beverage containers are made from at least 75% recycled materials will create markets while decreasing the burden of plastic waste in our landfills and making a positive impact on our climate. We thank Assemblymember Fahy for introducing this legislation and leading the way on addressing our waste crisis.”

At the same time, local governments have struggled in New York sell their recyclables as the prices for materials fall due to Chinese policy on importing foreign waste.

The bill, Fahy’s office said, is meant to to also stimulate economic opportunities for the existing recycling system in the state.

“Our nation’s plastic addiction is contributing to global warming and polluting our waterways and communities,” said Liz Moran, the environmental policy director for NYPIRG. “Plastic bottles were the 5th most commonly found litter in the 2019 international coastal cleanup. But the solution is simple – New York must reduce and eliminate single-use plastics. We applaud Assemblymember Pat Fahy for putting forward legislation that would significantly reduce plastic pollution and production, and set New York as a leader in addressing the current plastic pollution and recycling crisis.”